But, WHY not? Dietary Restrictions in Pregnancy. Part Two: Foods That May Pose Developmental Risks for Babies.

photo credit: jessica_wimer via photopin cc

photo credit: jessica_wimer via photopin cc

Finally! Here I am, ready with the long-awaited part two of my post on dietary restrictions in pregnancy. As discussed last time, it can be frustrating to face so many “don’ts” when pregnant, especially when that list doesn’t give any actual indication of what the rationales behind those warnings are. In this series, I’m exploring different foods and beverages that are typically not recommended for pregnant women including the reasons they are considered unsafe or unwise to consume. Part one was concerned with contamination and the increased risks associated with food poisoning in pregnancy. Today, in part two, I’ll be talking about food and drink items that are associated with developmental problems in babies.

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But, WHY not? Dietary Restrictions During Pregnancy. Part One: Contamination

photo credit: Dan Zen via photopin cc

photo credit: Dan Zen via photopin cc

As most of us are all too aware, pregnancy brings with it some pretty big lifestyle changes, especially in the realm of food and drink. Women are told to cut out alcohol and sushi, soft cheeses and coffee, but less often are they told the reasons behind those recommendations. You wind up following rules (or not) blindly, because no one ever bothers to answer the simple question, “why shouldn’t I eat _____ while I’m pregnant?”. As with all things birth, I feel that people are in the best position to make decisions for themselves when they have all of the relevant information available, rather than simply acquiescing or refusing based on what their friends did, what their doctor says or simply what feels right. Don’t get me wrong, friendly advice, medical recommendations and intuition are all super important, but they’re all also greatly improved by awareness of evidence gained from credible sources.

In this series of posts I will go over the main categories of food and drink restrictions and include common examples from each. First up: contamination.

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