Winter Prenatal Classes at Nurturing Health in Cobourg

 

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There will be a January-February childbirth education series at Nurturing Health Naturopathic Clinic, beginning January 14th. This series is perfect for anyone expecting to give birth in March or April.

This six-week course is designed to help you feel confident, calm and prepared as you approach your birth and new parenthood. It will also provide your partner with skills and knowledge that will aid them in supporting you during labour and birth, as well as postpartum. Continue reading for details!

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May-June Childbirth Education at Quinte Midwives

There will be a May-June childbirth education series at Quinte Midwives, beginning May 20th.  This course is designed to help you feel confident, calm and prepared as you approach your birth and new parenthood. It will also provide your partner with skills and knowledge that will aid them in supporting you during labour and birth, as well as postpartum. Continue reading for details! Continue reading

Spring and Summer Prenatal in Cobourg

photo credit: Bhumika.B via photopin cc

photo credit: Bhumika.B via photopin cc

Happy Spring! I am pleased to announce three upcoming childbirth education series’ in Cobourg. These courses are designed to help you feel confident, calm and prepared as you approach your birth and new parenthood. They will also provide your partner with skills and knowledge that will aid them in supporting you during labour and birth, as well as postpartum. Continue reading for details!

If you would prefer a course in Belleville, there are spots available in my Tuesday evening series at Quinte Midwives. The next series there begins April 22nd and there will be additional courses throughout the spring and summer.

Deadlines for registration are one week before the first day of class.
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Prenatal Education at Quinte Midwives

I am thrilled to announce that, beginning in April, I will be teaching regular prenatal classes at Quinte Midwives in Belleville. These classes are open to all expecting moms and their partners (or other support person), not only those who are clients with the midwives there. This course is designed to help you feel confident, calm and prepared as you approach your birth and new parenthood. It will also provide your partner with skills and knowledge that will aid them in supporting you during labour and birth, as well as postpartum.

Details of the first course:

Tuesday evenings, from 6 pm to 8:30 pm
5 weeks, beginning April 22nd, 2014
$200 per couple ($50 deposit due upon registration)
Quinte Midwives, Belleville

Topics for the course will include (but will not be limited to):

  • natural pain management and coping strategies for labour
  • the physiology of labour and birth
  • positions for labour and birth
  • risks and benefits of common interventions (including pain medications)
  • breastfeeding
  • postpartum care
  • newborn care and characteristics

To register, please fill out the contact form after the jump. Continue reading

Prenatal Education in Cobourg!

photo credit: Zixii via photopin cc

photo credit: Zixii via photopin cc

I am excited to announce an early spring weekend prenatal course at House of Wellness in Cobourg! This is a two-day intensive course designed to help you feel confident, calm and prepared as you approach your birth and new parenthood. It will also provide your partner with skills and knowledge that will aid them in supporting you during labour and birth, as well as postpartum.

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The Motherbaby Dyad: Can maternity care ever truly be ‘baby-friendly’ without first being ‘mother-friendly’?

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Most people now acknowledge that close physical proximity between mothers and babies during the first hours, days, weeks and even months of life is ideal for both. We know that being skin-to-skin encourages the baby’s oxygen levels to remain stable, that it regulates her temperature, that it encourages bonding between the two, that it stimulates milk production in the mother’s breasts and that babies held skin-to-skin for long periods tend to cry much less often (and have lower levels of stress hormones as a result). We know that breastfeeding on-demand helps both mother and baby adapt to life after birth; that room- and even bed-sharing helps everyone get more sleep, can prevent SIDS and make breastfeeding easier; that picking up a crying baby rather than letting them ‘cry it out’ keeps stress levels low and tends to lead to less anxiety later in life. Basically, the goal in all of these things is to allow the newborn to live outside of the womb in a manner that resembles life in the womb as closely as possible. Human babies are born essentially premature when compared to other mammals. While the calf can walk at birth and the baby chimp can cling to it’s mother’s back while she climbs, human babies are still essentially foetal. Why? Simply put, we walk upright, which affects the size and shape of our pelvic bones and we have big brains, which require large skulls to keep them in. In order for our human skulls to fit through our human pelvises (which they do very well, thank you very much – remember, as Ina May says, “Your body is not a lemon.”) we must be born early relative to other mammals. This works out ok, as long as we are prepared to care for what is essentially a foetus living outside of the womb. Doing so is even more demanding than pregnancy and requires support systems, maternity leaves, lots of encouragement and the ability to pick oneself up again time and time again (i.e. self-compassion). I have written before about the importance of community and social support systems for new parents but today I am thinking about the process of labour and birth and how they affect both mom and baby (or, motherbaby as many people are now referring to newborns and their moms to signify the importance of caring for them as a single entity). We accept that what happens after birth affects both mother and baby, but the evidence also shows that how a mother is treated prenatally and during labour and birth affects both individuals as well. So what does it mean for a hospital to be considered “mother-friendly” or “baby-friendly” and why are these two separate sets of considerations? Continue reading