Don’t Believe the Hype

This article from The Wall Street Journal provides some great historical information that connects meaningfully with my previous post (Home)Birth is Safe.

The author, Nathaniel Johnson notes that,

In 1923, Mary Breckinridge started the Frontier Nursing Service in rural Appalachia….Within a decade, the astonishing impact of that care was apparent. The women the Frontier Nursing Service cared for, who were desperately poor and usually gave birth at home, were 10 times less likely to die in childbirth than the average American at the time. The nation as a whole wouldn’t catch up until the 1950s, after the widespread acceptance of antiseptic and the discovery of antibiotics.

Given that antiseptic practices and the use of antibiotics are available and in use in midwife-attended home births today, it makes sense that, as Sheila Kitzinger has argued, it is not a high level of medicalization that makes birth safer – it is overall health: access to good pre-conception, prenatal and postpartum healthcare, good quality nutrition, access to clean water and access to skilled birth attendants. This has been borne out the world over, regardless of whether women are typically birthing at home or in hospitals. Access to medical interventions for the few women who actually need them is important, which is why midwives are thoroughly trained to detect possible complications before they become problematic and why they only support home births for women who are not at risk. Obstetricians are trained to deal with problems when they arise, but midwives are far more likely to be able to prevent them in the first place. Continue reading

Education is key! Next prenatal course begins March 5th.

I have another upcoming prenatal series starting at the Centre for Social Innovation, in the Annex, on March 5th. This course will run Tuesday evenings from 6:30-9 pm for six weeks.

If you are expecting a baby between late April and early June, this is the class for you! I cap my courses at six couples, so that my students can get to know one another and start building those new parent networks early. This course will give you and your partner the information and skills you need to cope with labour and birth; self-advocate effectively with your healthcare providers; know how breastfeeding should look and feel; know what to expect of a newborn; and make decisions about parenting that will work for you and your family.

The course is $240 per couple. Discounts are available for doula clients. Email me for more information, or to register.

Topics for the series include (but are not limited to):

-pain management and coping strategies for labour

-the physiology of labour and birth

-positioning for labour and birth

-risks and benefits of common interventions

-breastfeeding

-newborn care, characteristics and abilities

-parenting options

Education is the key to having a birth experience in which you feel confident, calm and in control.

Prenatal Classes at CSI Annex – Spaces Left!

I still have room left in the prenatal series beginning on Tuesday, January 8th at CSI Annex (720 Bathurst St.). This is a six-week course, running from 6:30-9pm Tuesday evenings.

Register now! heather@socialinnovation.ca

New testimonial!

I’m excited to post another lovely testimonial from a recent client!

I was initially hesitant to hire Heather due to her age and perceived lack of experience. However, after our first meeting with her and our subsequent experiences we couldn’t be happier with her expansive knowledge on not only birth coaching but everything you could ever want to know about pregnancy, labour, birth and post partum (we had her not only for our doula but also our prenatal class teacher). The enthusiasm she has for what she does is apparent in her thirst for knowledge and connection to the community. 

This being my first child I didn’t know what to expect from a doula. How could a relative stranger help me when my very own husband was unable to calm me down? As it turned out, Heather’s presence was invaluable; her cool head, confidence and pure enjoyment of the process put me in the best possible head space to have an unforgettable positive birth experience. Where I was tense and uncertain, Heather was calm. Where my husband was frazzled and scared, Heather was reassuring. She lead our fragile selves delicately and confidently through the most important and crazy moment of our lives, and for that I’m forever thankful! 

Birth at the Movies!

I have been absolutely terrible about posting lately – things have been super busy with lots of births, teaching, speaking engagements, event planning and Community Animation at the Centre for Social Innovation. All good things, but I miss having more time to write and share with all of you out there. Hopefully I will have more time soon!

In the meantime…I’m feeling pretty excited about the number of films coming out on the subject of birth these days. I think that the idea of birth as an opportunity for empowerment and birthing rights as a human rights issue are really starting to edge towards the mainstream (have you told someone about doulas today?!) and that these films are a sign of that movement. I thought I’d link to some trailers and things for those of you out there interested in checking out the latest and greatest in birth cinema. Continue reading

Spots Left for Summer/Fall Prenatal!

I still have room for a few more couples in my Summer-Fall Prenatal Series! For more info, see my earlier post here.

This course is ideal for anyone expecting to give birth between late September and December of 2012.

Come hear me speak tomorrow evening!

I will be speaking tomorrow evening at the Centre for Community Learning and Development in Regent Park about the importance of a satisfying and empowering birth experience, doula support and how it can help get you there, and options for those in financial need who would like to have doula support. The talk is free and begins at 6pm. There will be tons of time for questions, so come armed ;)

Come down and say hi!

Check out the poster for details